Tag Archives: Astronomy Picture of the Day

Hubbl’es 28Tth Birthday Picture: The Lagoon Nebula

  • Title Hubble’s 28th birthday picture: The Lagoon Nebula
  • Released 19/04/2018 4:00 pm
  • Copyright NASA, ESA, STScI, CC BY 4.0

To celebrate its 28th anniversary in space the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope took this amazing and colourful image of the Lagoon Nebula. The whole nebula, about 4000 light-years away, is an incredible 55 light-years wide and 20 light-years tall. This image shows only a small part of this turbulent star-formation region, about four light-years across.

This stunning nebula was first catalogued in 1654 by the Italian astronomer Giovanni Battista Hodierna, who sought to record nebulous objects in the night sky so they would not be mistaken for comets. Since Hodierna’s observations, the Lagoon Nebula has been photographed and analysed by many telescopes and astronomers all over the world.

The observations were taken by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 between 12 February and 18 February 2018.

Sail across the Lagoon Nebula here.

 

Credit: ESA

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Venus and the Triply Ultraviolet Sun

Venus and the Triple Ultraviolet Sun
Image Credit: NASA/SDO & the AIA, EVE, and HMI teams; Digital Composition: Peter L. Dove (http://www.flickr.com/photos/pldove/)

Explanation: An unusual type of solar eclipse occurred in 2012. Usually, it is the Earth’s Moon that eclipses the Sun. That year, most unusually, the planet Venus took a turn. Like a solar eclipse by the Moon, the phase of Venus became a continually thinner crescent as Venus became increasingly better aligned with the Sun. Eventually, the alignment became perfect and the phase of Venus dropped to zero. The dark spot of Venus crossed our parent star. The situation could technically be labelled a Venusian annular eclipse with an extraordinarily large ring of fire. Pictured here during the occultation, the Sun was imaged in three colours of ultraviolet light by the Earth-orbiting Solar Dynamics Observatory, with the dark region toward the right corresponding to a coronal hole. Hours later, as Venus continued in its orbit, a slight crescent phase appeared again. The next Venusian transit across the Sun will occur in 2117. </center>

Sources and References:

https://www.nasa.gov/
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180204.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/22nd_century#Transits_and_occultations
http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/

Astronomy Picture of the Day – Eclipsosaurus Rex

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Eclipsosaurus Rex 
Image Credit & CopyrightFred Espenak (MrEclipse.com)Explanation: We live in an era where total solar eclipses are possible because at times the apparent size of the Moon can just cover the disk of the Sun. But the Moon is slowly moving away from planet Earth. Its distance is measured to increase about 1.5 inches (3.8 centimeters) per year due to tidal friction. So there will come a time, about 600 million years from now, when the Moon is far enough away that the lunar disk will be too small to ever completely cover the Sun. Then, at best only annular eclipses, a ring of fire surrounding the silhouetted disk of the too small Moon, will be seen from the surface of our fair planet. Of course the Moon was slightly closer and loomed a little larger 100 million years ago. So during the age of the dinosaurs there were more frequent total eclipses of the Sun. In front of the Tate Geological Museum at Casper College in Wyoming, this dinosaur statue posed with a modern total eclipse, though. An automated camera was placed under him to shoot his portrait during the Great American Eclipse of August 21.

 

From: https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap171007.html